Singing from the same hymn sheet

Singing from the same hymn sheet

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Cyber security and those responsible for IT security need to get with the times. They can no longer afford to be the “No!” men/women and need to figure out how to become a business enabler.
In today’s environment, most would concur with this message. After all, we want access to our business and data from any location, any device and across the medium of connectivity that is most convenient for us – the end-user. Gone are the days of being shackled to a desk, locked to corporate laptop and funnelled through a VPN. It’s me and my 2.5 devices, any open hotspot I can find and direct line to the heart of the datacentre.

PUE: to compare is human – to improve is divine (Part 2 of 2)

PUE: to compare is human – to improve is divine (Part 2 of 2)

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This is the second part of our discussion about PUE and how I believe it should be used for those who are beginning on their journey to improve power effectiveness within their data centres.  In the first part we spoke about the basics of PUE and what the metric gives you.  In this part I discuss where to focus to reduce your PUE, what benefits must be derived it and when, pragmatically, you should NOT consider PUE improvement as an option.

How to move to the cloud

How to move to the cloud

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This article by DS details on how an enterprise can move to the cloud using a basic assessment.  This assessment is outlined and can be used for determining the viability and selection of suitable cloud providers.  Although not detailed the provided outline should serve well as a starting point and guideline.

Where legacy operations management comes up short

Where legacy operations management comes up short

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Most legacy operations management products miss the point and come up short. Many of these products, although implemented are ghosts. They lurk around in buildings with limited or no business benefit. Their primary focus is on monitoring uptime. This is often referred to as a RAG tool: Red, Amber, and Green where Red signifies down, Amber signifies intermittent connectivity problems and Green signifies good connectivity. This serves a limited business purpose and cannot justify any return on investment. The product development has been focussed on reporting on acceptable situations, as opposed to providing equal focus on operation in dire straits. How is this limited view operational monitoring? All it does is give you a comfortable feeling. With this approach, there is no difference in the value proposition of a cheap ‘keep alive pulse’ or an operational management framework product using more complex protocols worth millions.

Data Centre Design Principles, Guidelines and Standards

Data Centre Design Principles, Guidelines and Standards

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Over the past number of years, practicing as data centre design and management consultants, we’ve frequently been asked about data centre standards or guidelines and which is the best to apply when designing a new data centre or refurbishing/upgrading an existing site. In our opinion there are only a few that are “up there”. To provide insight in this regard we will shed some light on the matter and offer guidance within the context of the African data centre industry.

Importance of formal qualifications in data centres

Importance of formal qualifications in data centres

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Data centres are usually designed and built by a team consisting of electrical and mechanical engineers, fire consultants, architects and structural engineers, in conjunction with a number of others who are subject matter experts in their specific domains.  These teams should have the relevant experience and expertise to design and establish data centres. This is a highly specialised environment for this type of professional.

Being Transparent During a Crisis

Being Transparent During a Crisis

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A crisis can be one of the most stressful and testing events that you will likely have to face during your career. And they can make or break individuals, companies or any such group that is unfortunate enough to be dealt one.  Every organisation will experience a crisis of some sort during its existence. Crisis management and how a major incident is handled is one of the most crucial processes for an enterprise. A major incident, which is one with a significant negative business consequence, needs to be handled with a well-defined process which is not currently clearly defined in existing methodologies.  If you have done Crisis Management Training, then it’s likely that you are well prepared and the steps for managing a crisis are documented in your business continuity plan.  If not, at least consider the most important factor in any crisis – communication.

The importance of the Major Incident process

The importance of the Major Incident process

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ITIL mentions the Major Incident process as a special case of the incident management process as well its close relationship to problem management.  However, the Major Incident process requires greater clarity and specification as in many large enterprises the process is crucial for overcoming a crisis. A Major Incident typically defined as an incident with severe negative business consequences and an important duty of any designated Information Technology (IT) resources is to deal with Major Incidents in a structured manner.  We will address this important topic in a series of articles that specifically addresses the process and crisis management in general.